2017 Conference Program

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Wednesday, October 11

Welcome Reception | Grand Ballroom

Registration | Outside Grand Ballroom

Thursday, October 12

Morning Yoga/Dance Party | Exhibit Hall (Motor Lobby Level of the South Tower)

Breakfast & Registration | Outside Grand Ballroom

Welcome & Opening Plenary | Grand Ballroom

Breakout Sessions

A Double Edged Sword: CBD-Only Laws and Organizing for Medical Marijuana in the South | Cottonwood

Organizing led by parents of children suffering from medical conditions like epilepsy, autism and mitochondrial diseases has prompted the passage of “CBD-only” laws in states that previously had no medical marijuana access. These laws will help some people who are suffering, but many who could benefit from access to medical marijuana are left out. Are CBD-only laws helping or hurting the larger effort to establish robust state medical marijuana programs? Do they help destigmatize attitudes about marijuana, or reinforce stereotypes? What opportunities are there for other southern states now that Florida and Arkansas have passed medical marijuana laws?

Moderator

Jolene Forman, Staff Attorney, Drug Policy Alliance, Oakland, CA

Panelists

  • David Brown, President, Sensible Marijuana Policy for Louisiana, Baton Rouge, LA
  • Kevin Caldwell, Executive Director, CommonSense NOLA, New Orleans, LA
  • Sebastien Cotte, National Business Director, Flowering Hope Foundation, Atlanta, GA
  • Rebecca Forbes, Co-Founder CEO, NC Women for Cannabis and Director, American Cannabis Coalition, Harnett, Durham, NC
  • Thalia Michelle, Co-Founder, Director of Advocacy and Policy, Mothers Advocating Medical Marijuana for Autism, Austin, TX
  • Karen O'Keefe, Director of State Policies, Marijuana Policy Project, Los Angeles, CA
  • Steph Sherer, Executive Director, Americans for Safe Access, Washington, DC

Organizing While Criminalized | Redwood

What are the particular barriers imposed upon people who are criminalized in our society that can keep them from being front and center in the work and what do allies need to do to support and ensure them? How do travel bans and other parole restrictions impact criminalized organizers? And how does our own internal stigma impact them when we see people for their stories but not their strategies?

Moderator

asha bandele, Senior Director, Grants, Partnerships, and Special Projects, Drug Policy Alliance, New York, NY

Panelists

  • Susan Burton, Founder, A New Way of Life/All of Us or None, Los Angeles, CA
  • Michelle Crentsil, Program Associate, Open Philanthropy Project, New York, NY
  • Kenny Glasgow, Executive Director, The Ordinary People Society, Dothan, AL
  • Dorsey Nunn, Executive Director, Legal Services for Prisoners with Children/ Co-founder All of Us or None, San Francisco, CA
  • Kemba Smith, Author, Poster Child: The Kemba Smith Story, Norfolk, VA

Reallocating Revenue: Funding Reform with Reform? | International Ballroom E

(Spanish translation available)

For decades, the federal, state and local governments have thrown billions of dollars into police forces and jails. But this massive spending on policing and incarceration has done little to reduce drug addiction or to increase public safety. Some states shifted funding from law enforcement into community-based alternatives, such as education, local restorative justice services, and employment programs. How did they make this happen? What can other states learn from what has been done?

Moderator:

Lynne Lyman, Director, Strategy and Expansion, A New Way of Life, Los Angeles, CA

Panelists

  • Juston Cooper, Deputy Executive Director, Colorado Criminal Justice Reform Coalition, Denver, CO
  • Margaret Dooley-Sammuli, Criminal Justice and Drug Policy Director, ACLU of California, San Diego, CA
  • Andy Ko, Executive Director, Partnership for Safety and Justice, Portland, OR
  • Michael Mitchell, Senior Policy Analyst, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, Washington, DC

Food, Drugs, and Medicine: Where Do We Draw the Lines? | Dogwood A

The distinctions between food, drugs, and medicine are historical and social constructions imbued with political and economic interests. What are the differences between foods, drugs and medicines and where do they come from? What political interests do these distinctions currently serve? How do the economic interests of certain industries shape these discourses? How do race and gender shape these delineations? How does the commodification of these substances impact our understandings and experiences of them?

Moderator

Jules Netherland, Director, Office of Academic Engagement, Drug Policy Alliance, New York, NY

Panelists

  • Victoria Albina, Integrative Medicine Nurse Practitioner & Life Coach, Victoria Albina Health and Wellness, New York, NY
  • Cristin Kearns, Postdoctoral Fellow, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA
  • Craig Reinarman, Professor of Sociology and Legal Studies, University of California, Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA
  • Deborah Small, Executive Director, Break the Chains, Berkeley, CA
  • Ingrid Walker, Associate Professor, University of Washington Tacoma, Tacoma, WA

Moving Out of the Shadows: Harm Reduction for Stimulant Users | International Ballroom F

(Spanish and Portuguese translation available)

While most harm reduction services focus on reducing the risks of opioid use, they remain conspicuously limited with respect to stimulants. What does a harm reduction framework for stimulant use look like? What are the potential harms of stimulants and how can those harms be mitigated? Which novel interventions are practitioners and service providers utilizing? Which interventions might benefit from scientific evaluation and assessment? What can we learn from the practices and strategies of people who use stimulants? And what policy reforms are needed to support stimulant harm reduction?

Moderator

Lindsay LaSalle, Senior Staff Attorney, Drug Policy Alliance, Oakland, CA

Panelists

  • Mike Discepola, Director, Substance Health Services, San Francisco Aids Foundation, San Francisco, CA
  • Liz Evans, Executive Director, New York Harm Reduction Educators, New York, NY
  • Shaun Hopkins, Manager, The Works,Toronto Public Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Issac Jackson, Chapter President, Urban Survivor's Union, San Francisco, CA
  • Shilo Hassan Jama, Executive Director, The People's Harm Reduction Alliance, Seattle, WA
  • Daniel Raymond, Policy Director, Harm Reduction Coalition, New York, NY
  • Mindy Vincent, Executive Director, Utah Harm Reduction Coalition, Salt Lake City, UT

What Should High School Students Know About Drugs? | Dogwood B

Talking to high school-aged youth about drugs prepares them to make safer choices – whether they choose to use drugs or not. But sharing the honest truth about drugs with teens isn’t always easy. What do teens need to know before they step into adulthood? How do advocates work with school systems to bring in quality drug education programs? How can we evaluate the success of these programs in an abstinence-only world? Join drug education researchers, developers and practitioners as they discuss the methods they are using to engage with teens on issues related to drug use.

Moderator

Marsha Rosenbaum, PhD, Director Emerita, Drug Policy Alliance, San Francisco, CA

Panelists

  • Matt Aragon, Volcano Vista High School student, Albuquerque, NM
  • Jessica Colvin, MSW, MPH, PPSC, Wellness Director, Tamalpais Union High School District, Larkspur, CA
  • Nicholas Kent, President, Students for Sensible Drug Policy University of Melbourne and Graduate Teacher, Kew High School, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • Harvey Milkman, PhD, Professor of Psychology, Metropolitan University of Denver, Denver, CO
  • Dan Riest, Assistant Director, Knowledge Exchange, Centre for Addictions Research of BC, University of Victoria, Vancouver, Canada
  • Amani Rushing, Curriculum Manager, Drug Policy Alliance, New York, NY

Lunch (On your own)

Breakout Sessions

Social Clubs, Home Grow, Market Forces or Strict State Control: What is the Best Model for Regulating Marijuana? | International Ballroom F

(Spanish and Portuguese translation available)

As more and more jurisdictions move to legally regulate marijuana, policymakers and advocates are grappling with key questions about how to best implement a legal marijuana market. What are the models in other countries and what can we learn from them? What are the best ways to ensure good public health outcomes? How involved should state governments and other regulators be? What is the real threat of “Big Marijuana”? What are the pros and cons of alternatives like social clubs and home grow?

Moderator

Graham Boyd, Director, New Approach PAC, Santa Cruz, CA

Panelists

  • Steve Fox, Director, VS Strategies, Denver, CO
  • Nazlee Maghsoudi, Knowledge Translation Manager, International Centre for Science in Drug Policy, Canada
  • Maria Emilia Perez Espinosa, Member, Proderechos, Uruguay
  • Dan Riffle, Senior Legislative Assistant, US House of Representatives, Washington, DC
  • Steve Rolles, Senior Policy Analyst, Transform Drug Policy Foundation, United Kingdom
  • Constanza Sánchez Avilés, Law, Policy and Human Rights Director, International Center for Ethnobotanical Education, Research & Service, Spain

Drug Policy and Immigration: Connecting the Dots | Dogwood B

Immigration policy has taken center stage unlike any other political period in recent history. This roundtable discussion brings together a panel of experts to provide an overview of the intersections of drug policy and immigration across the American Sunbelt, where long established and emerging immigrant communities continue to grow. We will examine the current political climate under Trump’s escalation of the war on drugs, look at federal and state legislation, and examine what some municipalities are doing to stem the drug war’s increasing harms to immigrants.

Moderator

Armando Gudino, Policy Manager, Drug Policy Alliance, Los Angeles, CA

Panelists

  • Arnoldo Alonso, State Director, Texas Victory Project, Brownsville, TX
  • Danny Cendejas, Organizing Director, Detention Watch Network, Washington, DC
  • Angie Junck, Supervising Attorney, Immigrant Legal Resources Center, San Francisco, CA
  • Francesca Menes, Policy and Advocacy Director, Florida Immigrant Coalition, Miami, FL

Changing Geographies of Criminal Justice: How Are Drug Use and Mass Criminalization Impacting Rural America? | Cottonwood

Some rural counties continue to send huge numbers of people to prison per capita, often for lengthier terms than they would serve if they had been arrested in nearby urban areas. How has the nationwide, bipartisan trend toward reducing incarceration and criminalization impacted rural areas? What kinds of reform and advocacy efforts are necessary to make change happen in rural areas? What kinds of conversations about these issues are happening on the ground? What are the differences between rural criminal justice experiences in different regions of the country? And what is the impact of the prison-industrial complex in rural areas?

Moderator

Emily Kaltenbach, Senior Director, Criminal Justice Reform Strategy, Drug Policy Alliance, Santa Fe, NM

Panelists

  • LaTosha Brown, Project Director, Grantmakers for Southern Progress, Atlanta, GA
  • Hannah Cooper, Associate Professor, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA
  • Ryan Kiesal, Executive Director, ACLU of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City, OK
  • Tatewin Means, Graduate Studies Department Chair, Oglala Lakota College, Kyle, SD
  • Leah Pope, Senior Research Associate, Substance Use and Mental Health, Vera Institute of Justice, New York, NY
  • Nick Szuberla, Executive Director and Co-Founder, Working Narratives and Nation Inside, Wilmington, NC

Self-Care as a Radical Act | Redwood

As racial and social justice advocates, we strive to draw strength from intersectional movements past and present and affirm one another in the face of hate and oppression. How do we manage stress, build community, and stay healthy while fighting the good fight? How can we acknowledge and reduce the harm that doing this work can cause, especially to those directly impacted? And how can we do it intentionally in a way that heals ourselves and our communities? This workshop aims to provide advocates with concrete self-care skills to sustain activism over the long haul.  

Trainer

Victoria Albina, Integrative Medicine Nurse Practitioner & Life Coach, Victoria Albina Health and Wellness, New York, NY

How Does Criminalization Affect the Health of People and Communities? | International Ballroom E

(Spanish translation available)

The war on drugs has decimated communities through intrusive and violent policing practices. Such disruptions on daily life impact public health and, through mass criminalization, have long-term consequences for communities. How is the criminalization of certain communities counterproductive when it comes to public health? What are the particular impacts of the criminal justice system and law enforcement on health? How are policing, surveilling and supervising communities and community members deterrents to good public health? What are the intended and unintended impacts of policies aimed to improve health, like drug monitoring programs?

Moderator

Alexis Posey, Director of Policy, Center for Health Equity, NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, New York, NY

Panelists

  • Leo Beletsky, JD, MPH, Associate Professor of Law and Health Sciences, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, Adjunct Professor, Division of Global Public Health, UC San Diego School of Medicine, San Diego, CA
  • Tracie Gardner, Associate Director, Legal Action Center, New York, NY
  • Akwasi Owsu-Bempah, Assistant Professor of Sociology, University of Toronto, Mississauga, Toronot, CA
  • Tracy Pugh, PhD Candidate, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY
  • Tina Reynolds, Co-Founder, Women on the Rise Telling HerStory (WORTH), New York, NY

Who Do We Silence When We Forget About the Intersections of Sexuality, Gender, and Incarceration? | Dogwood A

The criminal justice system is based on the notion of reform -- reforming behaviors, reforming drug use, and reforming sexuality and gender, but what happens when all these meet? How are LGBTQIA+ people’s identities recognized and erased in the carceral state? How has drug use played a role in this community’s survival? What is the impact of policing on LGBTQIA+ people? What work have LGBTQIA+ organizations been doing to end the war on drugs and the prison-industrial complex?

Moderator

Queen Adesuyi, Policy Associate, Office of National Affairs, Drug Policy Alliance, Washington, DC

Panelists

  • Cecilia Chung, Senior Director of Strategic Projects, Transgender Law Center, Oakland, CA
  • Mik Kinkhead, Staff Attorney & Prisoner Justice Project Director, Sylvia Rivera Law Project, New York, NY
  • Alejandro Lanz Sánchez, Executive Director, Parces, Bogotá, Colombia
  • Alexis Martin, Development Associate, Drug Policy Alliance, New York, NY

Afternoon Break

Breakout Sessions

A Constitutional Right to Consume Drugs? Defeating the Drug War through Strategic Litigation | International Ballroom E

(Spanish translation available)

How can we build a successful drug policy litigation strategy that would secure expanded freedoms for people who use drugs? What would such a strategy look like? What can we learn from court victories in countries like Mexico, Canada and Spain? How can we use courts to fight for the right to possess and consume drugs, to inject in safe spaces, to abolish the death penalty for drug offenses? What can we learn from creative litigators in the U.S. that fought for desegregation, voting rights, juvenile justice, and marriage equality? What do we need to do now to foment constitutional litigation that yields systemic change down the line?

Moderator

Alejandro Madrazo, Professor-Researcher, Drug Policy Program, Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económicas, Mexico

Panelists

  • Scott Bernstein, Senior Policy Analyst, Canadian Drug Policy Coalition, Canada
  • Mikhail Golichenko, Senior Policy Analyst, Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network, Canada
  • Amber Marks, Director, Criminal Justice Centre, Queen Mary University of London, United Kingdom
  • Henrique de Souza, Justice Program Officer, Conectas, Brazil
  • Tripti Tandon, Deputy Director, Lawyers Collective, India

Drug War Déjà Vu: How Can Harm Reductionists Push Back Against Drug-Induced Homicide Laws, Harsh Fentanyl Penalties, and the Further Demonization of Drug Users? | Dogwood A

With the media hysteria over fentanyl, and some politicians clamoring for tough penalties on people who sell them, how should harm reductionists respond? In what ways do drug sellers practice harm reduction for themselves and for clients? What are appropriate harm reduction interventions for fentanyl? How do we message around this drug and efforts to enhance penalties, in light of its potency? What are effective public health responses to overdose deaths that can be traced to products laced with fentanyl? How do we respond to the recent rash of drug-induced homicide prosecutions and bills?

Moderator

Keegan Hamilton, Reporter, Vice News, New York, NY

Panelists

  • Dan Ciccarone, Professor of Family and Community Medicine at UCSF, San Francisco, CA
  • Traci Green, Deputy Director of Boston Medical Center’s Injury Prevention Center and Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine and Epidemiology at Brown University, Rhode Island
  • William Miller Jr., Peer Advocate, Baltimore POWER, Baltimore, MD
  • Daniel Raymond, Policy Director, Harm Reduction Coalition, New York, NY
  • Robert Suarez, Advocate and Health Educator, VOCAL-NY, Brooklyn, NY

Colonialism, Race and Psychedelics: How Do We Repair the Harms of Psychedelic Prohibition | International Ballroom F

(Spanish and Portuguese translation available)

Psychedelic prohibition is a legacy of racism, colonialism and the repression of indigenous cultures. This legacy continues today, with thousands of people – disproportionately young, non-white, and socioeconomically marginalized – getting handcuffed, arrested, branded for life as criminals, and serving time behind bars every year simply for using or possessing a psychedelic substance. How might we go about reducing the role of criminalization in psychedelic drug policy? How can we do so while avoiding the trap of “psychedelic exceptionalism”? Why is the “psychedelic community” so white? And how might we address the potential risks and benefits of “psychedelic tourism” in places such as Mexico, Peru, and Gabon?

Moderator

Nicholas Powers, PhD, Poet, Journalist and Professor of Literature at SUNY Old Westbury, New York, NY

Panelists

  • Ismail Ali, J.D., Policy & Advocacy Counsel, MAPS, Oakland, CA
  • Camille Barton, Diversity & Inclusion Consultant, Director of The Collective Liberation Project, and Social Justice Researcher, Bristol, UK
  • Ifetayo Harvey, Communications Associate, Drug Policy Alliance, New York, NY
  • Paula Graciela Kahn, Cultural Worker, Social Justice Leader, and Iraq War Tribunal Producer at CODEPINK, Los Angeles, CA
  • Bia Labate, PhD, Professor, Center for Research and Post Graduate Studies in Social Anthropology, Guadalajara, Mexico
  • LisaNa Red Bear, Community Educator, Humanities Scholar, and Mental Health Professional, Seattle, WA
  • Constanza Sánchez Avilés, Law, Policy and Human Rights Director, International Center for Ethnobotanical Education, Research & Service, Spain
  • Tehseen Noorani, PhD, Research Scientist and Adjunct Professor in Science & Technology Studies, NYU, New York, NY

Defending the Most Harmed | Dogwood B

How do we shape our policy and messaging to ensure they benefit those who have been made most vulnerable by the drug war? How has the nation taken an ever more hostile turn toward people who engage with illegal drugs or because of their birthplace or identity? Can rising tides lift all boats? Have they? And if they have or have not, what lessons are there to be culled in the storms we are now experiencing?

Moderator: Melissa Franqui, Manager, Communications and Marketing, Drug Policy Alliance, New York, NY

Panelists

  • Mary Hooks, Co-Director, Southerners on New Ground, Atlanta, GA
  • Antonio Gonzalez, President, William C Velasquez Institute, San Antonio, TX
  • Shilo Hassan Jama, Executive Director, The People's Harm Reduction Alliance, Seattle, WA
  • Deborah Small, Executive Director, Break the Chains, Berkeley, CA
  • Rafael Torruella, Executive Director, Intercambios Puerto Rico, San Juan, Puerto Rico
  • Michelle Wright, Policy Manager, Office of National Affairs, Drug Policy Alliance, Washington, D.C.

How Has the Drug War Reshaped Space, Place, and Relationships? | Cottonwood

From prison towns to million dollar blocks -- where more than $1 million is spent each year to incarcerate people from one city block -- drug policy is shaping what our communities and relationships look like. How has the drug war reshaped geography in the U.S.? What impact do these changes have on individuals and families? How do spatial shifts affect communities most impacted by the war on drugs? What are some current projects and solutions underway to address these shifts in geography?

Moderator

Tommy McDonald, Director of Multimedia, Drug Policy Alliance, Oakland, CA

Panelists

  • LaTosha Brown, Project Director, Grantmakers for Southern Progress, Atlanta, GA
  • Dominic Corva, Founder Co-Executive and Social Science Research Director, Political Geography Specialist, Seattle, WA
  • Natasha Frost, Associate Dean for Graduate Studies; Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice, Northeastern University, Boston, MA
  • Jesse Proudfoot, Junior Research Fellow, Department of Geography, Durham University, Canada
  • Nick Szuberla, Executive Director and Co-founder, Working Narratives, Wilmington, NC

Messaging and Social Media for Drug Policy Reform | Redwood

Great storytelling is an essential component of any successful advocacy campaign. In our drug policy work, it’s especially important to understand which audiences we need to persuade, and to frame reforms  in a way that advances our values and best resonates with key audiences. Who needs to know about your issue and why? What messages will move your audience from mere listeners to action takers? How do you mobilize audiences on social media? This workshop will use case studies of legislative advocacy and online campaigns to illustrate the importance of compelling messaging and storytelling.

Moderator

Melissa Moore, Deputy State Director, New York, Drug Policy Alliance, New York

Panelists

  • Jamila Brown, Digital Strategist, The Opportunity Agenda, New York, NY
  • Christiaan Perez, Manager of Advocacy and Digital Strategy, LatinoJustice PRLDEF, New York, NY
  • Roseanne Scotti, State Director, New Jersey, Drug Policy Alliance, Trenton, NJ

Film Screening - Written Off | Dogwood A

Candlelight Vigil

This candlelight vigil at the Center for Civil and Human Rights will pay tribute to all those who have perished as a result of the drug war. The Center for Civil & Human Rights is located at 100 Ivan Allen Junior Boulevard. When entering the Center grounds, you must utilize the sidewalks along Ivan Allen Jr. Blvd. and Centennial Olympic Park and are not permitted to cross Pemberton Place at any point.

Friday, October 13

Breakfast & Registration | Outside Grand Ballroom

Breakout Sessions

How to Create Change for Young Adults: College Campuses & Beyond | Cottonwood

Young people all around the world are taking active roles in creating and sharing honest drug education, promoting harm reduction services and advocating for policy change – whether it’s on their college campus or in other areas. What cutting edge campaigns are taking place, and who’s leading them? How did they organize their communities and overcome the same challenges of resistance and misunderstanding that other drug policy reform advocates face? And how can adults best support and partner with these rising young stars?

Moderator

Vilmarie Fraguada Narloch, PsyD, Drug Education Manager, Students for Sensible Drug Policy, Chicago, IL

Panelists

  • Zane Bader, Board Member, Students for Sensible Drug Policy, Athens, GA
  • Kevin Garcia, Board Member, Students for Sensible Drug Policy, Miami, FL
  • Kristin Karas, Director of Programs, DanceSafe, Denver, CO
  • Nicholas Kent, President, Students for Sensible Drug Policy University of Melbourne and Graduate Teacher, Kew High School, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • Imani Oakley, Chapter Member, Howard Law School Students for Sensible Drug Policy, Washington, DC
  • Sarah Saucedo, Chapter Advisor, Students for Sensible Drug Policy, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ

Vivitrol: Wonder Drug or "Shot" in the Dark? | Redwood

Will opioid antagonist treatments like naltrexone become widespread as a potential solution to the opioid epidemic? How are such treatments currently used, and what’s the best practice when deciding between agonist and antagonist treatments? Is naltrexone’s popularity solely a result of its non-agonist formulation (meaning it cannot get you “high”)? What does the research say about the effectiveness of naltrexone in coercive settings, as compared to voluntary, non-coercive settings? Can a treatment principally used in coercive settings become more widely adopted (court mandated and criminal justice in U.S., only available pharmacotherapy in Russia)? Why are proponents and opponents of this treatment often at odds? Is there a middle ground?

Moderator

Chinazo Cunningham, MD, MS, Associate Chief, Division of General Internal Medicine; Director, General Internal Medicine Fellowship Program; Director, Diversity Affairs, Dept. of Medicine; Professor of Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine/Montefiore Medical Center; New York, NY

Panelists

  • Patt Denning, PhD, author of Practicing Harm Reduction Psychotherapy; Director of Clinical Services and Training, The Center for Harm Reduction; San Francisco, CA
  • Josiah “Jody” Rich MD, MPH., Professor of Medicine, Professor of Epidemiology, the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University and Attending Physician, the Miriam Hospital; Director and Co-founder of The Center for Prisoner Health and Human Rights at The Miriam Hospital, Co-Founder of the Centers for AIDS-Research collaboration in HIV in corrections (CFAR-CHIC) initiative; Providence, RI
  • Maia Szalavitz, journalist and author of Unbroken Brain; New York, NY

Sex Work, the Drug War, and the Need for Decriminalization | International Ballroom E

(Spanish translation available)

The war on sex workers and the war on drugs share some underlying logics and points of intersection. But often missing from the conversation has been deep discussion about the advantages of decriminalization versus legal regulation.  How are the war on sex workers and the war on drugs linked? What rhetoric and ideologies do they share? What can drug policy reformers learn from conversations in the sex worker community about legalization and decriminalization? How is the law enforcement and criminal justice apparatus deployed in both arenas?

Moderator

Sheila Vakharia, Policy Manager, Office of Academic Engagement, Drug Policy Alliance, New York, NY

Panelists

  • Cyndee Clay, Executive Director, HIPS, Washington, DC
  • alix lutnick, PhD, Senior Research Scientist, RTI International, San Francisco, CA
  • Sarah Mann, Editor, Open Minds Quarterly, Northern Initiative for Social Action, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada
  • Andrea Ritchie, Attorney and Organizer, New York, NY
  • Caity Simon, Co-editor, Tits and Sass, Holyoke, MA

The Drug War in the South | Dogwood A

The drug war has been particularly harsh in the deep south, where drug reform advocates have long been fighting against some of the most draconian policies. What have been some of the collateral consequences that communities have faced? How do those align with what we are seeing nationally? Where and what are the possibilities for reform?

Moderators

Michelle Wright, Policy Manager, Drug Policy Alliance, Washington, DC

Panelists

  • Rev. Kenny Glasgow, Executive Director, The Ordinary People Society, Dothan, AL
  • Deon Haywood, Executive Director, Women With a Vision, New Orleans, LA
  • Mary Hooks, Co-Director, Southerners on New Ground, Atlanta, GA
  • Nsombi Lambright, Director of Resource Development & Communications, One Voice, Jackson, MS
  • Julia Negron, Founder, Suncoast Harm Reduction, Sarasota, FL
  • Sharon Ravert, Executive Director, Peachtree NORML, Atlanta, GA

But What About Pookie?*: An Honest Look into What Legalization Means for Local Drug Sellers | International Ballroom F

Spanish and Portuguese translation available)

In 2014, D.C.’s successful marijuana legalization campaign adopted the slogan, “Legalization ends discrimination.”  Has it? What are the direct and indirect impacts of legalization on impacted communities most harmed by the drug war? Where has the legal market left people who support themselves and their families by selling drugs? How do Black and Brown dealers and their communities get a piece of the billion dollar pie that legalization has cooked up? How could legalization help address systemic structural inequalities in communities deeply impacted by the racist drug war and mass incarceration?

Moderator

Chris Alexander, Policy Coordinator, Drug Policy Alliance, New York, NY

Panelists

  • Vicki Hanson, Member, Ganja Growers & Producers Association, Jamaica
  • Nico Montano, Research Associate, Vera Institute of Justice, New York, NY
  • Steven Pacheco, Fellow, Ron Moelis Social Innovation Fellowship, Bronx, NY
  • Jackie Johnson, Associate Professor and Department Chair Sociology, Adelphi University, Garden CIty, NY
  • Dorsey Nunn, Executive Director, Legal Services for Prisoners with Children/ Co-founder All of Us or None, San Francisco, CA

Mass Criminalization is the Problem: Broadening the Mass Incarceration Approach | Dogwood B

The so-called criminal justice system and its many tentacles extend well beyond jails and prisons. How do we unwind from this carceral state where too many behaviors are criminalized and considered jail-able offenses? Are heavily punitive administrative sanctions in lieu of criminal penalties really an improvement? How exactly has mass incarceration been supported by broader mass criminalization? Why is it that simply reducing the number of people behind bars doesn’t do enough to repair the communities that have borne the brunt of mass criminalization? How are the drug war and its intrusive tactics an extension of mass criminalization, and vice versa?

Moderator

asha bandele, Senior Director, Grants, Partnerships and Special Projects, Drug Policy Alliance, New York, NY

Panelists

  • Tracie Gardner, Associate Director, Legal Action Center, New York, NY
  • Angie Junck, Supervising Attorney, Immigrant Legal Resources Center, San Francisco, CA
  • Lisa Sangoi, Soros Justice Advocacy Fellow, NYU Law Family Defense Clinic, New York, NY
  • Deborah Small, Executive Director, Break the Chains, Berkeley, CA
  • Art Way, Senior Director, Criminal Justice Reform Strategy, Drug Policy Alliance, Denver, CO

Feature Plenary - Who Run the World: Women’s Leadership & Drug Policy Reform | Grand Ballroom

Lunch (On your own)

Breakout Sessions

Disrupting Narratives: Myths of the Drug Policy Reform Movement | International Ballroom E

(Spanish translation available)

The stories we tell about drugs matter. But what if those stories we hold most dear are lies? How then, do the dualisms we maintain (e.g., user/dealer, officer/arrestee, violent/non-violent, researcher/subject, expert/novice) impede our ability to think innovatively? This interactive session will explore the power and seduction of narratives – their organizing structures and casts of characters; and their ability to turn arbitrary facts into self-evident truth. Working together, we’ll explore how telling a different story brings us closer to ending the war on drugs – and the role of mixed methods, ethnographic and historical research in getting us there.

Moderator

Laura McTighe, Postdoctoral Fellow, Dartmouth Society of Fellows, Co-founder and Associate Director of Front Porch Research Strategy, Hanover, NH

Panelists

  • Shaquita Borden, Director of Research and Evaluation, Women with a Vision, New Orleans, LA Helena Hansen, Assistant Professor, New York University, New York, NY
  • Lynn Paltrow, Executive Director, National Advocates for Pregnant Women, New York, NY
  • Dr. Samuel Roberts, Director, Columbia University Institute for Research in African-American Studies (IRAAS), Associate Professor of History, Columbia Univ. Sch. of Arts & Sciences, Associate Professor of Sociomedical Sciences, Columbia Univ. Mailman School of Public Health, New York, NY
  • Shaun Shelly, Researcher/Policy, Advocacy and Human Rights Manager, University of Pretoria/ TB/HIV Care Association, Cape Town, South Africa

Nine Months In: What's Happening With Criminal Justice Reform Under Trump? | Dogwood A

How has criminal justice reform fared under Trump? What has happened to the much-lauded bipartisan coalition? What progress has been made at the local, state and federal levels? What are the most hopeful opportunities for successful reform initiatives? What will the next three years (and beyond) look like?

Moderator

German Lopez, Senior Reporter, Vox News, Washington DC

Panelists

  • Sakira Cook, Senior Counsel, The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, Washington D.C.
  • Craig DeRoche, Senior Vice President of Advocacy & Public Policy, Prison Fellowship Ministries, Lansdowne, VA
  • Jason Hernandez, Youth Outreach, Grace To Change, McKinney, TX
  • Jesselyn McCurdy, Senior Legislative Counsel, American Civil Liberties Union, Washington D.C.
  • Jason Pye, vice president of legislative affairs, FreedomWorks, Atlanta, GA

Fundraising Best Practices from the Field | International Ballroom F

(Spanish and Portuguese translation available)

We all need to fundraise to advance the missions of our organizations. But it is getting more challenging to do so as our field grows and the philanthropic environment evolves. What are foundations looking for these days? What do individual donors want? What works best to motivate online giving? Get answers to these questions and much more – and bring your questions for an extended Q-and-A session.

Moderator

Ellen Flenniken, Managing Director, Development, Drug Policy Alliance, New York, NY

Panelists

  • Laura Cole, Associate Director of Account Services, Sanky Communications, New York, NY
  • Michelle Crentsil, Program Associate, Open Philanthropy Project, New York, NY
  • Jason Flom, President, Lava Records, DPA Board Member, New York, NY
  • Nsombi Lambright, Director of Resource Development & Communications, One Voice, Jackson, MS
  • Maggie Lear, President, The Frances Lear Foundation, New York, NY

Working to Overcome Stigma and Ensure Access to Healthcare for All Drug Users in Uncertain Times | Dogwood B

For people who use drugs, or are recovering from problematic drug use, stigma can be a barrier to a wide range of opportunities and rights, including access to health and harm reduction services. How can we help dismantle the barriers of stigma around drug use to ensure access to quality healthcare and harm reduction services? Is disparate Hep C treatment illustrative of the barriers that people who use drugs face in attempting to get care? Given the uncertainty about the Affordable Care Act, what is the best way to address stigma and disparities in access and care for people who use drugs?

Moderator

Kellen Russoniello, Staff Attorney, Health & Drug Policy, ACLU San Diego, San Diego, CA

Panelists

  • Alyssa Aguilera, Executive Director, VOCAL NYC, New York, NY
  • Tina Broder MSW, MPH, Program Director, Washington, D.C.
  • Katie Burk, Viral Hepatitis Coordinator, Community Health Equity & Promotion Branch, Population Health Division, San Francisco Department of Public Health, San Francisco, CA
  • Denise Cullen, Executive Director, Broken No More, Burbank, CA
  • Rachel McLean, MPH, Chief, Office of Viral Hepatitis Prevention, California Department of Public Health, Richmond, CA
  • Christine Rodriguez, Program Advisor, California Department of Public Health, Richmond, CA
  • Chad Sabora, Founder, MO Harm Reduction Network, St. Louis, MO
  • Dr. Mojgan Zare, Executive Director, Atlanta Harm Reduction Coalition, Atlanta, GA

“Pills & Potions”: How is Harm Reduction Different for Young Black People Who Party? | Cottonwood

To be young, Black and using alcohol and other drugs recreationally is a triple threat of potential risk. From prescription pills to “lean” to classics like alcohol and marijuana, what are the drug use patterns of young black people in various party scenes? What are the best ways to do outreach and education work with this community and keep them safe? How do traditional drug education and harm reduction efforts fall short? How are safe spaces for enjoyment and fun created and protected, given the ongoing police targeting that these young people experience in their everyday lives?

Moderator

Morgan Humphrey, Policy Coordinator, Drug Policy Alliance, Los Angeles, CA

Panelists

  • Joey Nunez Estrada Jr., Assistant Professor, School Counseling Program, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA
  • Paidamoyo Azehko, Creative Director of Erostribe, San Francisco, CA
  • Kellye Greene, Director, Northeast Region and NY DanceSafe chapter, New York, NY
  • Joel Gullet, Texas Nightlife Personality, Dallas-Fort Worth, TX
  • Manushka Magloire, Director of Community Affairs & Culture, Afropunk Festival, New York, NY
  • Jake Plowden, Co-Founder, Cannabis Cultural Association, New York, NY

Beyond the Smoke, Behind Closed Doors: What Does Legalization Look Like in Private vs. Public Spaces? | Redwood

With marijuana legalization making strides across the globe, how to regulate public consumption is a hot topic. How have jurisdictions that allow for possession and private use of marijuana dealt with public smoking and vaping? What lessons can be learned from previous discussions regarding tobacco and alcohol? How have the restaurant and bar industries responded so far? What are the most pressing public health implications of public consumption? What do responsible, effective and harm reduction-minded modes of regulation look like? What are the best examples of pending proposals and ongoing advocacy campaigns? What could be some unintended consequences of this advocacy?           

Moderator

Chris Alexander, Policy Coordinator, Drug Policy Alliance, New York, NY

Panelists

  • Patricia Amiguet, President of the Federation of Cannabis Associations, Catalonia, Spain
  • Bruce Barcott, Deputy Editor, Leafly.com, Seattle, WA
  • Kaitlyn Boecker, Policy Manager, Office of National Affairs, Drug Policy Alliance, Washington D.C.
  • Kayvan S.T. Khalatbari, Founder, Denver Relief Consulting, Denver, CO
  • Ashley Kilroy, Executive Director, Marijuana Policy, Mayor's Office, Denver, CO

Afternoon Break

Breakout Sessions

Psychedelic Research: Remaining Obstacles and New Visions | Cottonwood

We are now in the midst of what is often called a psychedelic research renaissance. Clinical studies are under way at top medical schools and research institutes worldwide, and psychedelic therapy is beginning to be re-accepted by the medical community. Yet the drug war and its ideology continue to drastically limit the scope of scientific research. Where are we at in the effort to make psychedelics legally available for medical and therapeutic purposes? What does this mean for efforts to reduce the role of criminalization outside of medical or other clinical contexts? What are the limitations of psychedelic medicalization in the context of the drug war and its ideology? How can we shift decision-making authority away from law enforcement, while empowering health and science experts?

Moderator

Jag Davies, Director of Communications Strategy, Drug Policy Alliance, New York, NY

Panelists

  • Nese Devenot, PhD, Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Puget Sound, and Research Fellow at the NYU Psilocybin Cancer Anxiety Study
  • Rick Doblin, PhD, Founder & Executive Director, MAPS, Boston, MA
  • Katherine Maclean, PhD, Director, Psychedelic Education and Continuing Care Program, New York, NY
  • Tehseen Noorani, PhD, Assistant Professor, Clinical and Community Psychology, University of East London, UK

Lobbying 101 | Redwood

How does an idea become a law? This workshop will walk you through the legislative process and provide insights on how a bill becomes a law. We will hear directly from people who craft and grapple with state and federal legislation on how to be effective advocates for policy reform.

Moderator

Jolene Forman, Staff Attorney, Drug Policy Alliance, Oakland, CA

Panelists

  • Michael Collins, Deputy Director, Office of National Affairs, Drug Policy Alliance, Washington, D.C.
  • Eunisses Hernandez, Policy Coordinator, Drug Policy Alliance, Los Angeles, CA
  • Artie Malkin, Co-founder and Principal, Malkin & Ross, Albany, NY

Checking Out Drug Checking: Can It Solve the Overdose Crisis? | International Ballroom E

(Spanish translation available)

“Drug checking,” or testing a substance in order to provide information about its contents and purity, is a crucial and potentially life-saving harm reduction intervention. And yet it isn’t widely called for in the U.S. – even in light of the increasing number of overdoses related to fentanyl and other novel psychoactive substances. How exactly does drug checking work? Who’s already doing it successfully around the world and what can we learn from them? How can the nightlife and opiate harm reduction communities band together to make expensive-but-vital drug checking technology accessible?

Moderator

Stefanie Jones, Director of Audience Development, Drug Policy Alliance, New York, NY

Panelists

  • Tino Fuentes, Former Director, Naloxone Program and Former Co-Director, Syringe Access Program, St. Ann’s Corner of Harm Reduction, Bronx, NY
  • Mitchell Gomez, Executive Director, DanceSafe, Denver, CO
  • Mark Lysyshyn, MD MPH FRCPC, Medical Health Officer, Vancouver Coastal Health, Vancouver, BC, Canada
  • Fiona Measham, Professor of Criminology, Durham University and Founder, The Loop, Durham, UK
  • Chloe Sage, Education Prevention Coordinator, ANKORS, Nelson, BC, Canada
  • Eliza Wheeler, Overdose Response Strategist, Harm Reduction Coalition, Oakland, CA

Who Profits From the Drug War? | Dogwood A

The war on drugs has historically targeted poor communities and communities of color. As forms of mass criminalization and social control continue to evolve, one thing remains true –those who profit from the drug war continue to prosper off the destruction of peoples’ lives throughout the world. What criminal justice policies and practices perpetuate such profiteering? How can advocates advance reforms that eliminate financial profit in the criminal justice system? What do these new policies look like and how do they protect individuals’ civil liberties and human rights?

Moderator

Lynne Lyman, Director of Strategy and Expansion, A New Way of Life, Los Angeles, CA

Panelists

  • Alex Friedmann, Managing Editor of Prison Legal News, Human Rights Defense Center, Nashville, TN
  • Mary Hooks, Co-Director, Southerners on New Ground, Atlanta, GA
  • Bob Libel, Executive Director, Grassroots Leadership, Austin, TX
  • Roseanne Scotti, State Director, New Jersey, Drug Policy Alliance, Trenton, NJ
  • Sara Totonchi, Executive Director, Southern Center for Human Rights, Atlanta, GA
  • Pamela Winn, Fellow, JustLeadership, Atlanta, GA

The Global War on Drugs: A Tool of Oppression Against Black Lives around the World | International Ballroom F

(Spanish and Portuguese translation available)

Across the world, the war on drugs was created and has been consistently used as a tool of oppression against racial and ethnic minorities. How are the origins of the war on drugs inextricably linked to racism and racial prejudice? How do patterns of racial disparities in drug war arrests, murders and treatment responses that transcend national borders? What does the drug war look like for people of color in Brazil, France, Jamaica, the United Kingdom and the U.S.? How are advocates around the world working to fight this systemic oppression?

Moderator

Jasmine L. Tyler, Advocacy Director, US Programs, Human Rights Watch, Washington, D.C.

Panelists

  • Vicki Hanson, Member, Ganja Growers & Producers Association, Jamaica
  • Fabrice Olivet, Director, Auto Support des Usagers de Drogues (ASUD), France
  • Eduardo Ribeiro, Director, Black Initiative for New Drug Policies, Brazil
  • Deborah Small, Executive Director, Break the Chains, Berkeley, CA
  • Simon Woolley, Director, Operation Black Vote, England, United Kingdom

Why Criminal Justice and Drug Policy Reform are Latinx Issues | Dogwood B

The war on drugs has always been a war on immigrants and people of color. How can we best unpack the impacts of criminal justice and drug policies on the Latinx community? How do we frame criminal justice and drug policy reform through a Latinx lens? How has the drug war been used to criminalize Latinxs? How can Latinxs best organize to reform the criminal justice system?

Moderator

Lex Steppling, National Organizer, Equal Justice USA, Brooklyn, NY

Panelists

  • Juan Cartagena, President and General Counsel, LatinoJustice PRLDEF, New York, NY
  • Eunisses Hernandez, Policy Coordinator, Drug Policy Alliance, Los Angeles, CA
  • Jason Hernandez, Youth Outreach, Grace To Change, McKinney, TX
  • Maritza Perez, Soros Justice Fellow, MALDEF, Washington, D.C.
  • Jorge Renaud, Organizer for Texas advocates for justice, Texas Criminal Justice Coalition, Austin, TX

Town Hall - Case for Reparations: 50 Years After the Drug War and Mass Incarceration, What Does America Owe Us? | Grand Ballroom

Film Screening - Cocaine Prison | International Ballroom F

Film Screening - The Last Stop | Dogwood A

Film Screening - Lifers Madness The Movie | International Ballroom E

Saturday, October 14

Breakfast & Registration | Outside Grand Ballroom

Breakout Sessions

Psychedelics 101: What Do Psychedelics Have To Do With Drug Policy Reform? | Cottonwood

For many people in our movement, experiences with psychedelic drugs played a pivotal role in their understanding of drug policy reform. What potential avenues are available to reform psychedelic drug policies? How has the drug war hindered research and science-based public policy? Is there any hope of seeing a sensible regulation system for psychedelics in our lifetimes? And how can people working on psychedelic research and drug policy reform find more common ground and collaborative opportunities?

Moderator

Stefanie Jones, Director of Audience Development, Drug Policy Alliance, New York, NY

Panelists

  • Natalie Ginsberg, Policy & Advocacy Director, MAPS, Oakland, CA
  • Mitchell Gomez, Executive Director, DanceSafe, Denver, CO
  • Julie Holland, M.D., Psychopharmacologist, Psychiatrist, and Author of Moody Bitches and Weekends at Bellevue, New York, NY
  • Andrea Langlois, Communications & Development Officer, ICEERS, Victoria, Canada
  • Andrew Tatarsky, M.D., Founder & Director, Center for Optimal Living, New York, NY

Drugs, Sex Work and Housing Insecurity: Reaching Hard-to-Reach Young People | Redwood

Young people who use drugs, involved in sex work, and/or lack housing are often the hardest to reach. What are the demographics of this growing population? What innovative restorative justice or harm reduction strategies have been employed? What’s worked and what hasn’t? What can the drug policy reform movement learn from the experiences of these young people?

Moderator

Samantha Master, African American Leadership and Engagement Specialist, Planned Parenthood Federation of America, Washington, D.C.

Panelists

  • Queen Adesuyi, Policy Associate, Office of National Affairs, Drug Policy Alliance, Washington, D.C.
  • Shaena Johnson, Executive Director, EmpowerBR, Baton Rouge, LA
  • Alejandro Lanz Sánchez, Executive Director, Parces, Bogotá, Colombia
  • Gina Womack, Executive Director, Family and Friends of Louisiana's Incarcerated Children, New Orleans, LA

Reform for People Who Sell Drugs?: Challenging a Taboo of Drug Policy Reform | International Ballroom E

(Spanish translation available)

How can we advocate for those who sell drugs? Is this another area where DAs hold too much power? How does marijuana legalization and the reality of structural inequity provide a platform for advocacy? How have women been impacted by draconian drug selling laws? How does the punitive talk around drug policy emanating from the White House impact state reform efforts? What can be done on a local level? What would the ideal diversion program for those who sell drugs look like? Are there international models we can build from?

Moderator

asha bandele, Senior Director, Grants, Partnerships and Special Projects, Drug Policy Alliance, New York, NY

Panelists

  • Daryl Atkinson, Formerly Incarcerated, Convicted Peoples and Family Movement, Leadership Council, Raleigh, NC
  • Deniel Denvir, Fellow at the Fair Punishment Project, Providence, RI
  • Constanza Sánchez Avilés, Law, Policy and Human Rights Director, International Center for Ethnobotanical Education, Research & Service, Spain
  • Lyn Ulbricht, CEO, Ross Ulbricht Defense Fund, Florence, CO
  • Kemba Smith, Author, Poster Child: The Kemba Smith Story, Norfolk, VA

One Size Doesn't Fit All: Culturally Competent Harm Reduction | Dogwood A

As the opioid crisis grows across the country, many are looking toward alternatives to punitive drug policies, namely, harm reduction services. While this is a positive step in the right direction, we must acknowledge that a "one-size fits all" approach to harm reduction leaves many in harm’s way. Can we truly fulfill the harm reduction promise to “meet people where they are at” if we do not approach our work with a culture-specific lens? What is culturally competent harm reduction? How can we integrate it into the current harm reduction framework? What are the benefits and challenges to a culture-specific framework for harm reduction? What role can allies and the traditional harm reduction movement play in broadening the scope of what we define as harm reduction?

Moderator

Dr. Samuel Roberts, Director, Columbia University Institute for Research in African-American Studies (IRAAS), Associate Professor of History, Columbia Univ. Sch. of Arts & Sciences, Associate Professor of Sociomedical Sciences, Columbia Univ. Mailman School of Public Health, New York, NY

Panelists

  • Zina Age, CEO, Aniz, Inc., Atlanta, GA
  • Lyn Ayala, Prevention Specialist, Washington Heights Corner Project, New York, NY
  • Dr. Carrie Ann Lawrence, Assistant Researcher, Indiana School of Public Health-Bloomington, Project Director, Project Cultivate, Bloomington, IN
  • Sasanka Jinadasa, Capacity Building and Community Resource Manager, HIPS, Washington, DC

Marijuana Legalization and the Movements for Racial and Social Justice | International Ballroom F

(Spanish and Portuguese translation available)

We know how marijuana prohibition has harmed communities. We also know that the collateral consequences associated with prohibition are far-reaching and complex. How have those of us working toward marijuana legalization found intersectionality between this movement and others concerning racial and social justice. How can legalization be a vehicle for racial justice, social justice, and criminal justice reform? And how we can ensure that this movement reaches its full potential when it comes to racial and social justice?

Moderator

Kristen Maye, PhD Candidate, Brown University, Providence, RI  

Panelists

  • Juan Cartagena, President and General Counsel, LatinoJustice PRLDEF, New York, NY
  • Scott Hechinger, Senior Staff Attorney, Brooklyn Defender Services, Brooklyn, NY
  • Lynne Lyman, Director of Strategy and Expansion, A New Way of Life, Los Angeles, CA
  • Marie Mark, Supervising Attorney, Padilla Support Center, Immigrant Defense Project, New York, NY

The Fight in Asia: Drug Policy Reform in an Unforgiving Region | Dogwood B

The rights of people who use and sell drugs are severely under attack in many parts of Asia – with capital punishment for drug offenses in Indonesia, extrajudicial killings in the Philippines, widespread torture in treatment centers in China, and virulent vigilante groups in Myanmar. Why are many of these policies so widely supported by the public? What historical and cultural features are informing current political approaches? How do advocates in the region work toward drug policy reform in such hostile circumstances? What strategies do they use to affect change? Where do they find hope for the future?

Moderator

Matt Wilson, Deputy Director, Global Drug Policy Program, Open Society Foundations, New York, NY

Panelists

  • Edo Agustian, National Coordinator, Persaudaraan Korban Napza Indonesia (PKNI), Indonesia
  • Inez Feria, Director, No Box Transitions, Philippines
  • RickyGunawan, Director, LBH Masyarakat, Indonesia
  • Goro Koto, Director, Japan Advocacy Network for Drug Policy, Japan
  • Tripti Tandon, Deputy Director, Lawyers Collective, India

Morning Break

Breakout Sessions

Coca & Cocaine: Models for Legal Cultivation, Production and Sale | International Ballroom F

(Spanish and Portuguese translation available)

Home to the three major coca-producing countries, drug policy reform in Latin America necessitates a conversation about the coca leaf and cocaine. How can a legal market for coca products be created that benefits local producers? What can we learn from models of production for cacao, coffee and marijuana? Can we envision a Fair Trade market for coca products that is socially, economically and environmentally responsible? How might regulating coca and cocaine help reduce drug war violence in Latin America? Is the public ready for a serious conversation about regulating cocaine? What are possible models for cocaine regulation that would ensure the best possible public health outcomes?

Moderator

Zara Snapp, Drug Policy Consultant, Drug Policy Alliance, ATS, EQUIS, Mexico

Panelists

  • Pedro Jose Arenas Garcia, Director, Observatorio de Cultivos y Cultivadores Declarados Ilícitos, Colombia
  • Patricia Chulver Benitez, Director, Fundación Acción Semilla, Bolivia
  • Diego Garcia-Devis, Senior Program Officer, Open Society Foundations, New York, NY
  • Julián Andrés Quintero López, Executive Director, Corporación Acción Técnica Social, Colombia
  • David Restrepo, Strategy and Innovation Consultant, Colombia and the UK
  • Dora Troyano, Ecologist, Fundación Tierra de Paz- SENA Centro Agropecuario, Colombia

Indigenous Voices and Experiences in the Drug War | Dogwood B

In a special intimate conversation with two experts from the indigenous community, we will explore the impact of the drug war and drug classification on indigenous health, culture, and community. What has been the impact of the war on drugs on indigenous land? What are the most pressing issues and concerns of indigenous people impacted by the drug war and colonization? How has drug classification and an influx of outsiders affected sacred ceremonies? How can drug policy reformers create a movement that includes indigenous leadership and takes seriously the concerns and health needs of native peoples? What are some solid next steps that drug policy reformers can take to help raise awareness about and address the ways indigenous peoples are impacted by the war on drugs?

Moderator

asha bandele, Senior Director, Grants, Partnerships and Special Projects, Drug Policy Alliance, New York, NY

Panelists

  • Dawn D. Davis, Indigenous Scholar, BigTree Enviromental LLC, Fort Hall, ID
  • Crystal Lee, PhD, MPH, TITLE, UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine-Center for HIV Identification, Prevention, and Treatment Services, Los Angeles, CA

What About the Children? Bridging the Gaps Between Drug Policy Reform and Child Welfare Advocacy | Cottonwood

This session will explore the unique challenges faced by pregnant and parenting people who use drugs, while considering the impact of drug policy within child welfare systems. What is the role of drug policy reform in child welfare policy? What are the priorities for a drug policy reform-minded child welfare advocacy agenda? How can drug policy reformers productively engage with and/or effectively resist the agendas of mainstream child welfare stakeholders? How do intersectional alliances between drug policy reformers and others promote our collective movement and ensure that reform efforts equitably address the needs of all parents who use drugs?

Moderator

Meagan Glaser, Deputy State Director, New Jersey, Drug Policy Alliance, Trenton, NJ

Panelists

  • Indra Lusero, Founder and Executive Director, Elephant Circle, Denver, CO
  • Joyce McMillan, Director of Programming and Parent Advocate, Child Welfare Organizing Project, New York, NY
  • Dinah Ortiz, Parent Advocate Supervisor with the Family Defense Practice, The Bronx Defenders, Bronx, NY
  • Lynn Paltrow, JD, Executive Director, National Advocates for Pregnant Women, New York, NY
  • Joelle Puccio, Perinatal nurse and harm reductionist, National Perinatal Association’s Workgroup on Perinatal Substance Use, Seattle, WA
  • Lisa Sangoi, JD, Soros Justice Advocacy Fellow, Family Defense Clinic at NYU School of Law, Brooklyn, NY

Organizing In A Moment of Political Crisis: Making Drug Policy Central to Social Justice Organizing | Redwood

How do we organize our communities to advance long lasting policy reforms? How does a community mobilize to change laws and hold elected officials accountable? How can one person make a real difference? This session seeks to provide a brief overview of organizing strategies and tactics used to advance drug policy reforms. We will go over the inner workings of an advocacy campaign and explain how to mobilize your community.

Moderator

Lex Steppling, National Organizer, Equal Justice USA, Brooklyn, NY 

Panelists

  • Alyssa Aguilera, Executive Director, VOCAL NY, Brooklyn, NY
  • Deon Haywood, Executive Director, Women With A Vision, New Orleans, LA
  • Eunisses Hernandez, Policy Coordinator, Drug Policy Alliance, Los Angeles, CA

Cannabis Reform in Trump’s America | International Ballroom E

(Spanish translation available)

For the past several years the federal government has largely restricted its enforcement of federal marijuana laws in states with medical marijuana or marijuana legalization laws. Under the Trump administration, the status quo may change. Since taking office, Trump and Attorney General Jeff Sessions have made several statements signaling that state marijuana programs may be subject to federal intervention. How will the Trump administration impact marijuana law reform efforts? How do reformers best protect victories? How can states prevent or mitigate damage from federal interference? What legal, legislative, and media strategies can we implement to limit federal marijuana enforcement?

Moderator

Jasmine L. Tyler, Advocacy Director, US Programs, Human Rights Watch, New York, NY

Panelists

  • John Hudak, Deputy Director of the Center for Effective Public Management and a Senior Fellow in Governance Studies, Brookings Institution, Washington, D.C.
  • Wanda James, CEO, Simply Pure Dispensary, Denver, CO
  • Rob Kampia, Executive Director, Marijuana Policy Project, Washington, D.C.
  • German Lopez, Senior Reporter, Vox, Washington, D.C.
  • Tamar Todd, Senior Director, Office of Legal Affairs, Drug Policy Alliance, Oakland, CA

An Oxymoron No More: Red State Harm Reduction | Dogwood A

What does harm reduction in red states look like? What strategies have yielded the best results in red states thus far and who have we still failed to reach? How does the approach/messaging need to change at the rural, urban and metropolitan levels, and what are some of the key lessons that have been learned? How do we engage voters in the red states hit hardest by the opioid epidemic in supporting harm reduction interventions? Finally, as we move forward to ensuring that a critical mass of folks get access to health services and non-coercive treatment, what will success entail?

Moderator

Robert Childs, Executive Director, NC Harm Reduction Coalition, Wilmington, NC

Panelists

  • Hannah Cooper, ScD Associate Professor, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA
  • Verna Gaines Mathis, Program Director, ATL Harm Reduction Coalition, Atlanta, GA
  • Rhonda Irving, CEO/Founder for Capitol Area Reentry Program, Inc., Baton Rouge, LA
  • Moki Macias, Executive Director, Atlanta/Fulton County Pre-Arrest Diversion Initiative, Atlanta, GA
  • April Young, PhD, MPH, Assistant Professor, Dept. of Epidemiology, University of Kentucky College of Public Health, Lexington, KY
  • Jon Zibbell, PhD, Senior Public Health Analyst, Behavioral & Urban Health Program, RTI International, Atlanta, GA

Lunch (On your own)

Breakout Sessions

Supervised Injection Facilities: Coming Soon to a City Near You | International Ballroom E

(Spanish translation available)

Policies addressing opioid use such as safe injection sites have recently gained traction in some U.S. cities garnering national attention. How do you engage stakeholders, cultivate the media, and win over the public on such “cutting edge” harm reduction efforts? What challenges did advocates on the ground encounter on their road to success? What lessons can we learn from working with elected officials in these localities? This workshop will help prepare advocates to lay the groundwork for such reform back in their home states and municipalities.

Moderator

Kaitlyn Boecker, Policy Manager, Office of National Affairs, Drug Policy Alliance, Washington, D.C.

Panelists

  • Terrell Jones, Outreach & Advocacy Manger, NY Harm Reduction Educators, New York, NY
  • William Miller Jr., Peer Advocate, Baltimore POWER, Baltimore, MD
  • Patricia Sully, Staff Attorney, Public Defenders Association, Seattle, WA
  • Laura Thomas, Deputy State Director, California, Drug Policy Alliance, San Francisco, CA
  • Gwen Wilkinson, Ithaca Drug Policy Coordinator, Ithaca, NY

Prison Without Walls: The Drug War and the Expansion of the Surveillance State | Dogwood A

How have invasive surveillance practices become normalized outside of prisons and jails? To what extent are surveillance technologies initially used in prisons or jails emerging in people’s daily lives? What are the financial, social and psychological costs of these technologies? What role has the drug war played in justifying increased surveillance in communities, especially poor communities and communities of color? For those under formal criminal justice control, to what extent do surveillance technologies help keep people in their communities and with their families, and how should these benefits be weighed against the normalization of such invasive conditions?

Moderator

Art Way, Senior Director, Criminal Justice Reform Strategy, Drug Policy Alliance, Denver, CO

Panelists

  • Margaret Dooley-Sammuli, Criminal Justice and Drug Policy Director, ACLU of California, San Diego, CA
  • Rufus Hunley, Business Operations Manager & Paris Patrick, Investigator, Fulton County Government, Atlanta, GA
  • Reuben Jonathan Miller, Assistant Professor, School of Social Service Administration, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL
  • Steven Renderos, Organizing Director, The Center for Media Justice, Oakland, CA
  • Christopher Scott, Senior Policy Advisor, Open Society Foundations, Washington, DC

Learning from Each Other: A South-South Dialogue on Drug Policy | International Ballroom F

(Spanish and Portuguese translation available)

Much of prohibitionist global drug policy has been handed down or enforced by the United States and the Global North. What are the particular challenges that come with being producer and transit countries for the vast majority of drug consumption that takes place in North America and Europe? What does harm reduction look like for different types of drugs in different countries? What does harm reduction look like for producer and transit countries? What can countries in Latin America and Africa learn from each other?

Moderator

Daniel Wolfe, Director, International Harm Reduction Development, Public Health Program, Open Society Foundations, New York, NY

Panelists

  • Lugard Abila, Program Officer, Reachout Centre Trust, Kenya
  • Maria-Goretti Ane, IDPC Consultant for Africa, International Drug Policy Consortium, Ghana
  • Ernesto Cortés, Director, Asociación Costarricense de Estudios e Intervención en Drogas, Costa Rica
  • Amaya Ordorika Imaz, Member, ReverdeSer Colectivo; Researcher, Mexican Commission for the Defense and Promotion of Human Rights, Mexico
  • Isabel Pereira Arana, Drug Policy Lead Researcher, Center for the Studies of Justice, Law and Society (Dejusticia), Colombia
  • Ted Wandera , Program Officer, Key and Affected Populations, KELIN, Kenya

The Untouchables: How the Drug War Justifies Police Misconduct | Dogwood B

Charged with enforcing drug criminalization, police are often the conduit into the criminal justice system for people who use or sell drugs. How does drug prohibition serve as a political cover for unlawful police searches, raids, brutality and even murder? How is the demonization of people who use or sell drugs used to legitimize police misconduct? Is the drug war simply the current iteration of state-sanctioned violence against people of color? Do diversion programs like LEAD help alleviate some of these issues? How can police play a more helpful and productive role in drug policy?

Moderator

Maria McFarland Sánchez-Moreno, Executive Director, Drug Policy Alliance, New York, NY

Panelists

  • André Contrucci, Coordinator, Centro de Convivência É de Lei, Brazil
  • Neill Franklin, Executive Director, Law Enforcement Action Partnership, Baltimore, MD
  • Harry Levine, Professor of Sociology, City University of New York; Co-Director, Marijuana Arrest Research Project, New York, NY
  • Kris Nyrop, LEAD National Support Director, Public Defender Association, Seattle, WA
  • Andrea Ritchie, Attorney and Organizer, New York, NY
  • Marcela Tovar Thomas, Director, Centro de Pensamiento y acción para la Transición, Colombia

Ibogaine, Kratom, Marijuana and Psychedelics: What Role Can Drugs Play in Treating Addiction? | Cottonwood

Researchers and people wanting to reduce or stop their use of opioids and other drugs have been investigating innovative therapies and exit drugs like kratom and marijuana. What can we learn from people who have used ibogaine and psychedelics as an adjunct to psychotherapy? What do we know of the benefits of using one drug to reduce the use of another drug? What are the benefits of using substitution drugs like diacetylmorphine (pharmaceutical grade heroin)? How can we make the most of the mobilization around kratom and marijuana to advance the therapeutic use of other substances to address opioid use disorder?

Moderator

Jessica Gelay, Policy Manager, Drug Policy Alliance, Santa Fe, NM

Panelists

  • Anita Briscoe, Advance Practice Registered Nurse, Taos, NM
  • Kevin Franciotti, Graduate Psychology Student, The New School for Social Research, New York, NY
  • Philippe Lucas, PhD(c), VP Patient Research and Access, Tilray, Centre for Addictions Research of BC, Nanaimo, Candada
  • Gabriel Pendas, Director of Programs, Minority Cannabis Business Association, Portland, OR
  • Clare Wilkins, Director, Pangea Biomedics, San Diego, CA

Intersectional Connections | Redwood

Intersectionality is crucial when assessing how to move drug policy forward. What is intersectionality and how do we incorporate that into our work as drug policy reformers? How can we use intersectionality to reframe our work? What is our role? How do we begin to analyze and break down these systems to end the war on drugs, from many vantage points? How do we frame our advocacy to ensure that we are intersecting with varying communities?

Moderator

Ifetayo Harvey, Communications Associate, Drug Policy Alliance, New York, NY

Panelists

  • Dr. Iva Carruthers, General Secretary of Samuel Dewitt Proctor Conference, Chicago, IL
  • Shakyra Diaz, Managing Director, CSSJ Alliance for Safety and Justice, Cleveland, OH
  • Angie Milan-Cruz, Hep C Navigator VOCAL-NY, New York, NY
  • Mike Nguy, School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY

Afternoon Break

Closing Plenary | Grand Ballroom

Achievement Awards Ceremony & Reception | Grand Ballroom

Tickets are $35 and there will be a limited number available for purchase at registration.